Teach a Child to Spell in 3 Steps - eBook

Code: CCspelle
Year Level: Year 1 & 2
$65.00 (inc. $5.91 GST)

In stock

Targeting alphabet sounds, phonemic segmentation and CVC spelling

Single word spelling involves three primary base skills:

  1. Visual Skills: The recognition of the alphabet symbol and the conversion of this symbol into a sound (ie: Not letter name).
  2. Auditory Skills: The phonemic awareness skill of blending three sounds (or phonemes) together to form a word.
  3. Fine Motor Skills: The formation or handwriting of the symbols.

The following example illustrates the establishment of early spelling ability. To spell the word ‘sun’ a student must:

  1. Apply phonemic awareness skills and identify the initial sound ‘s’, retrieve the symbol ‘s’ from the visual memory and then form or write the letter ‘s’.
  2. The student must again apply phonemic awareness skills and identify the medial sound ‘u’, retrieve the ‘u’ from the visual memory and then write the letter ‘u’.
  3. The final step requires the phonemic awareness skill of identifying the final ‘n’ sound then retrieving from the visual memory the ‘n’ symbol and finally write the ‘n’.

Once this spelling process has been rehearsed the students can typically spell the word automatically and often through the application of letter names ‘s-u-n’. Students will typically read better than they will spell. This is because the recognition of the words (i.e. reading) is typically much easier than the reproduction of the letter sound correspondences to formulate the words. It is common for students to require repeated targeted spelling practice, in order to master skills.

This publication is mentioned within the Year 1 & 2 Teaching Sequence Manual on page 19.

Teach a Child to Spell in 3 Steps

Code: CCspell
Year Level: Year 1 & 2
$82.50 (inc. $7.50 GST)

In stock

Targeting alphabet sounds, phonemic segmentation and CVC spelling

Single word spelling involves three primary base skills:

  1. Visual Skills: The recognition of the alphabet symbol and the conversion of this symbol into a sound (ie: Not letter name).
  2. Auditory Skills: The phonemic awareness skill of blending three sounds (or phonemes) together to form a word.
  3. Fine Motor Skills: The formation or handwriting of the symbols.

The following example illustrates the establishment of early spelling ability. To spell the word ‘sun’ a student must:

  1. Apply phonemic awareness skills and identify the initial sound ‘s’, retrieve the symbol ‘s’ from the visual memory and then form or write the letter ‘s’.
  2. The student must again apply phonemic awareness skills and identify the medial sound ‘u’, retrieve the ‘u’ from the visual memory and then write the letter ‘u’.
  3. The final step requires the phonemic awareness skill of identifying the final ‘n’ sound then retrieving from the visual memory the ‘n’ symbol and finally write the ‘n’.

Once this spelling process has been rehearsed the students can typically spell the word automatically and often through the application of letter names ‘s-u-n’. Students will typically read better than they will spell. This is because the recognition of the words (i.e. reading) is typically much easier than the reproduction of the letter sound correspondences to formulate the words. It is common for students to require repeated targeted spelling practice, in order to master skills.

This publication is mentioned within the Year 1 & 2 Teaching Sequence Manual on page 19.

Teach a Child to Spell in 3 Steps – School License
School licensing allows schools to purchase a license for a product or range of products and allow all teaching and support staff access to the electronic resource for as long as the subscription is active. To learn more about school licensing please click here.

Code: CCspell (School License)
Year Level: Year 1 & 2

School licensing options are currently being developed to allow schools to share products with staff electronically (e.g. saved on servers or accessible within online platforms) and will be available soon. If you would like to be notified when this offering is available, please express your interest here.

  • Teach a Child to Spell in 3 Steps
    Year 1 & 2 Assessment Schedule

    The following Year 1 & 2 full year assessment schedule and scope and sequence have been extracted from the Year 1 & 2 Screening &

  • Teach a Child to Spell in 3 Steps
    Speech and Language Development Milestones – 5 years old
    This milestone poster/sheet details the speech and language developmental milestones for 5 year olds.

    Designed by speech and language pathologists, the speech and language milestone sheets provide a list of typical milestones that should be attained by specific ages.

  • Teach a Child to Spell in 3 Steps
    Ages and Stages of Literacy Development – Ages 3 – 12
    A fact sheet which identifies age related milestones for literacy development in children from 3 years of age. Included are decoding and spelling skill checklists for Stage 1 (or Year 1) through to Stage 5 (or Year 5).

    Many parents wonder if their child’s reading skills are developing at the normal rate. While there are individual differences, there is a general progression of

  • Teach a Child to Spell in 3 Steps
    PLD’s 2020 Whole School Literacy Plan
    The document outlines how to implement PLD's literacy, Movement and Motor and Oral Language resources during the Early Years, Foundation, Year 1 & 2 and across Years 3 to 6. Each page provides suggested time frames and implementation recommendations.

    The purpose of this document is to provide an implementation outline to assist schools in scheduling the PLD programs within a broad school-based strategy. When

National Curriculum Statement

This download outlines how PLD programs link to the ACARA National Curriculum year level content descriptions.

ISBN : 9781921560897
ISBN : 9781921560897

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