Teach a Child to Read in 3 steps

Code: CCread
Year Level: Year 1 & 2
$82.50 (inc. $7.50 GST)

In stock

Targeting alphabet sounds, phonemic blending and CVC decoding

Single word decoding involves two primary base skills:

  1. Visual Skills: The recognition of the alphabet symbol and the conversion of this symbol into a sound (ie: Not letter name).
  2. Auditory Skills: The phonemic awareness skill of blending three sounds (or phonemes) together to form a word.

The following example illustrates the process of early decoding. To read the word ‘sit’ a student must:

  1. Visually recognise the symbol ‘s’ and convert the symbol to the sound /s/.
  2. Visually recognise the symbol ‘i’, and convert the symbol into the sound /i/.
  3. Visually recognise the symbol ‘t’, and convert the symbol into the sound /t/.
  4. Finally, the ‘s’, ‘i’ and ‘t’ sounds are held in the working memory, then need to be blended together to form the word.

Over time children become more efficient at a visual and an auditory level. For example, rather than decoding the word ‘sit’ in three parts the word may be decoded in two parts (e.g. s-it). After much decoding practice students develop automatic word recognition and will read the word in full without sounding.

This publication is mentioned within the Year 1 & 2 Teaching Sequence Manual on page 19.

Teach a Child to Read in 3 steps - eBook

Code: CCread
Year Level: Year 1 & 2
$65.00 (inc. $5.91 GST)

In stock

Targeting alphabet sounds, phonemic blending and CVC decoding

Single word decoding involves two primary base skills:

  1. Visual Skills: The recognition of the alphabet symbol and the conversion of this symbol into a sound (ie: Not letter name).
  2. Auditory Skills: The phonemic awareness skill of blending three sounds (or phonemes) together to form a word.

The following example illustrates the process of early decoding. To read the word ‘sit’ a student must:

  1. Visually recognise the symbol ‘s’ and convert the symbol to the sound /s/.
  2. Visually recognise the symbol ‘i’, and convert the symbol into the sound /i/.
  3. Visually recognise the symbol ‘t’, and convert the symbol into the sound /t/.
  4. Finally, the ‘s’, ‘i’ and ‘t’ sounds are held in the working memory, then need to be blended together to form the word.

Over time children become more efficient at a visual and an auditory level. For example, rather than decoding the word ‘sit’ in three parts the word may be decoded in two parts (e.g. s-it). After much decoding practice students develop automatic word recognition and will read the word in full without sounding.

This publication is mentioned within the Year 1 & 2 Teaching Sequence Manual on page 19.

Teach a Child to Read in 3 steps – School License

School licensing options are currently being developed to allow schools to share products with staff electronically (e.g. saved on servers or accessible within online platforms) and will be available soon. If you would like to be notified when this offering is available, please express your interest here.

  • Teach a Child to Read in 3 steps
    Maximising literacy development within the Junior Primary

    At PLD we advocate for a strong junior primary process, in which the connections between classrooms and year levels is well organised. Most students require

  • Teach a Child to Read in 3 steps
    The Pathway of Pre-Literacy into Early Literacy

    Schools will have literacy results maximized over the long-term when they systematically plan how students progress from pre-literacy (or emergent literacy skills) into their early

  • Teach a Child to Read in 3 steps
    Listen A3 poster
    To Create A Good Speaking And Listening Environment

    Brainstorm with students what makes a good listener and speaker. Have a reward system that promotes good listening and speaking behaviours in the classroom. Give

  • Teach a Child to Read in 3 steps
    PLD’s 2020 Whole School Literacy Plan
    The document outlines how to implement PLD's literacy, Movement and Motor and Oral Language resources during the Early Years, Foundation, Year 1 & 2 and across Years 3 to 6. Each page provides suggested time frames and implementation recommendations.

    The purpose of this document is to provide an implementation outline to assist schools in scheduling the PLD programs within a broad school-based strategy. When

National Curriculum Statement

This download outlines how PLD programs link to the ACARA National Curriculum year level content descriptions.

ISBN : 9781921560880
ISBN : 9781921560880

People who viewed this also viewed...

  • Alphabet the Multi Sensory Way – Foundation Font
    From $51.00$51.00 incl. GST
    Teach a Child to Read in 3 steps
    A program for 4-6 year olds, incorporating Stage 1 phonic concepts.

    Single word decoding involves two primary base skills: Visual Skills: The recognition of the alphabet symbol and the conversion of this symbol into a sound (ie: Not letter name). Auditory Skills: The phonemic awareness skill of blending three sounds (or phonemes) together to form a word. The following example illustrates the process of early decoding. To read the word ‘sit’ a student must: Visually recognise the symbol ‘s’ and convert the symbol to the sound /s/. Visually recognise the symbol ‘i’, and convert the symbol into the sound /i/. Visually recognise the symbol ‘t’, and convert the symbol into the sound /t/. Finally, the ‘s’, ‘i’ and ‘t’ sounds are held in the working memory, then need to be blended together to form the word. Over time children become more efficient at a visual and an auditory level. For example, rather than decoding the word ‘sit’ in three parts the word may be decoded in two parts (e.g. s-it). After much decoding practice students develop automatic word recognition and will read the word in full without sounding. This publication is mentioned within the Year 1 & 2 Teaching Sequence Manual on page 19.

  • Teach a Child to Spell in 3 Steps
    From $65.00$65.00 incl. GST
    Teach a Child to Read in 3 steps
    Targeting alphabet sounds, phonemic segmentation and CVC spelling

    Single word decoding involves two primary base skills: Visual Skills: The recognition of the alphabet symbol and the conversion of this symbol into a sound (ie: Not letter name). Auditory Skills: The phonemic awareness skill of blending three sounds (or phonemes) together to form a word. The following example illustrates the process of early decoding. To read the word ‘sit’ a student must: Visually recognise the symbol ‘s’ and convert the symbol to the sound /s/. Visually recognise the symbol ‘i’, and convert the symbol into the sound /i/. Visually recognise the symbol ‘t’, and convert the symbol into the sound /t/. Finally, the ‘s’, ‘i’ and ‘t’ sounds are held in the working memory, then need to be blended together to form the word. Over time children become more efficient at a visual and an auditory level. For example, rather than decoding the word ‘sit’ in three parts the word may be decoded in two parts (e.g. s-it). After much decoding practice students develop automatic word recognition and will read the word in full without sounding. This publication is mentioned within the Year 1 & 2 Teaching Sequence Manual on page 19.

  • Preparing for Reading
    From $65.00$65.00 incl. GST
    Teach a Child to Read in 3 steps
    A phonemic awareness program for 4 and 5 year olds targeting CVC blending.

    Single word decoding involves two primary base skills: Visual Skills: The recognition of the alphabet symbol and the conversion of this symbol into a sound (ie: Not letter name). Auditory Skills: The phonemic awareness skill of blending three sounds (or phonemes) together to form a word. The following example illustrates the process of early decoding. To read the word ‘sit’ a student must: Visually recognise the symbol ‘s’ and convert the symbol to the sound /s/. Visually recognise the symbol ‘i’, and convert the symbol into the sound /i/. Visually recognise the symbol ‘t’, and convert the symbol into the sound /t/. Finally, the ‘s’, ‘i’ and ‘t’ sounds are held in the working memory, then need to be blended together to form the word. Over time children become more efficient at a visual and an auditory level. For example, rather than decoding the word ‘sit’ in three parts the word may be decoded in two parts (e.g. s-it). After much decoding practice students develop automatic word recognition and will read the word in full without sounding. This publication is mentioned within the Year 1 & 2 Teaching Sequence Manual on page 19.

  • Sale!
    Essential Low Entry Year 1 and 2 Starter Pack
    $252.00$319.00 $214.21$271.17
    Teach a Child to Read in 3 steps
    Supporting students entering Year 1 and 2 with low literacy skills.

    When students enter Year 1 and 2 with very low literacy skills it can be very confronting for teachers. While some students can be assigned