Teach a Child to Read in 3 steps

Code: CCread
Year Level: Year 1 & 2
$82.50 (inc. $7.50 GST)

In stock

Targeting alphabet sounds, phonemic blending and CVC decoding

Single word decoding involves two primary base skills:

  1. Visual Skills: The recognition of the alphabet symbol and the conversion of this symbol into a sound (ie: Not letter name).
  2. Auditory Skills: The phonemic awareness skill of blending three sounds (or phonemes) together to form a word.

The following example illustrates the process of early decoding. To read the word ‘sit’ a student must:

  1. Visually recognise the symbol ‘s’ and convert the symbol to the sound /s/.
  2. Visually recognise the symbol ‘i’, and convert the symbol into the sound /i/.
  3. Visually recognise the symbol ‘t’, and convert the symbol into the sound /t/.
  4. Finally, the ‘s’, ‘i’ and ‘t’ sounds are held in the working memory, then need to be blended together to form the word.

Over time children become more efficient at a visual and an auditory level. For example, rather than decoding the word ‘sit’ in three parts the word may be decoded in two parts (e.g. s-it). After much decoding practice students develop automatic word recognition and will read the word in full without sounding.

This publication is mentioned within our Whole School Literacy Strategy on page 19.

Teach a Child to Read in 3 steps - eBook

Code: CCread
Year Level: Year 1 & 2
$65.00 (inc. $5.91 GST)

In stock

Targeting alphabet sounds, phonemic blending and CVC decoding

Single word decoding involves two primary base skills:

  1. Visual Skills: The recognition of the alphabet symbol and the conversion of this symbol into a sound (ie: Not letter name).
  2. Auditory Skills: The phonemic awareness skill of blending three sounds (or phonemes) together to form a word.

The following example illustrates the process of early decoding. To read the word ‘sit’ a student must:

  1. Visually recognise the symbol ‘s’ and convert the symbol to the sound /s/.
  2. Visually recognise the symbol ‘i’, and convert the symbol into the sound /i/.
  3. Visually recognise the symbol ‘t’, and convert the symbol into the sound /t/.
  4. Finally, the ‘s’, ‘i’ and ‘t’ sounds are held in the working memory, then need to be blended together to form the word.

Over time children become more efficient at a visual and an auditory level. For example, rather than decoding the word ‘sit’ in three parts the word may be decoded in two parts (e.g. s-it). After much decoding practice students develop automatic word recognition and will read the word in full without sounding.

This publication is mentioned within our Whole School Literacy Strategy on page 19.

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ISBN : 9781921560880
ISBN : 9781921560880

National Curriculum Statement

Expressing and developing ideas - Spelling - Know that regular one syllable words are made up of letters and common letter clusters that correspond to the sounds heard, and how to use visual memory to write high frequency words