Blog Posts in Chronological Order

Sight words are a special high frequency category of words that students are instructed to recognise automatically. While that is the end goal, how is this ability developed and how can sight words be instructed? The following strategies can be applied to all sight words: Strategy 1: Sound-Out the Words When the high frequency sight […]

This video clip provides a model of the pronunciation of each of the alphabet sounds with an Australian accent. The viewing of the clip aims to assist those working with children to articulate the best model of the common sound linked to each alphabetic symbol and thereby assist the transition to early reading, spelling and writing.

Perhaps the most common question we are asked by Teachers, Coordinators and Education Support Staff is how to go about implementing a Whole School Literacy Strategy within their school. We have recently updated our online publication “Implementing PLD resources within a ‘Whole School Literacy Strategy’ policy” which includes: An Individual Education Plan (IEP) for non-reading […]

The Junior Primary Spelling Activities resource is intended to provide a definition of synthetic phonics and related skills, an understanding of the importance of synthetic phonics, and practical suggestions for how to teach synthetic phonics within the classroom.

There is little benefit to students if words are spelled correctly within the spelling cycle (when they are most familiar) but that long-term knowledge is not established.

There is currently insufficient handwriting instruction in Australian schools and children’s handwriting has become slower because they practice less.When handwriting becomes automatic, children can concentrate on what they are writing not how they are writing. A multisensory approach appears to have significant advantages in developing handwriting skills and a consistent reading and handwriting font is recommended to enhance children’s handwriting and literacy acquisition. Through establishing ideal handwriting technique, each student’s potential for academic success will be maximised.

As children reach middle primary school, developed language skills are critical for gaining academic understanding of content and information as well as communicating socially.In this era, many daily activities do not require children to have to use language. For example: watching tv, playing computer games, using a playstation, sitting quietly on their DS, watching DVDs whilst driving…

This post is a detailed discussion on the background, philosophies and strategies of teaching Sight Words in early literacy tuition. Sight words. the special category of words that students are instructed to recognise automatically (i.e. without picture cues or sounding-out.) and which comprise over half of every newspaper article, textbook, children’s story and novel.

A PLD customer asks; “We are going to have Parent/Teacher interviews soon as we want to “share” and “source” as much information with parents as possible as early as possible. I believe that there are questions early childhood teachers should ask parents about the child’s development since birth. Can you please be of assistance.

At what age should children be able to aurally discriminate between “th” and “f”? This is a great question which we are often asked. The aim of this post is to help provide strategies which you can adopt when working with children who struggle with the differences between these sounds.

Today on the PLD website we respond to a recent enquiry we received on the research that underpins the PLD range of teaching resources. The post contains information on and links to some of the research and resources that is the basis of the three step PLD Literacy approach.

We love getting such great feedback on the PLD literacy development program and its materials. The following testimonial demonstrates how even with poor student entry levels a quality program with quality instruction and delivery can still produce positive outcomes.

We love getting feedback from users of our programs and learning the impact these programs can have in everyday classroom situations. We recently received the following email regarding our Developing Narrative Skills Program which we have shared with you today.