Maximising literacy development within the Junior Primary

Year Level:

At PLD we advocate for a strong junior primary process, in which the connections between classrooms and year levels is well organised. Most students require three consecutive strong years of learning in the junior primary to set them up for entry into the ‘content’ curriculum phase of their schooling.

This download provides a series of tasks that teaching staff can work through to strengthen the junior primary teaching focus and support the organisation of resources, testing and schedule of teaching.

With the aid of this download, many schools report greater consistency within year levels and across year levels is achieved. For other schools, a Skype ‘coaching session’ may be required to work through some of the opinions/issues that can arise in such a process.

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  • Maximising literacy development within the Junior Primary
    Assessments for students experiencing difficulty within Stage 1 – Target 1,2,3

    If students are experiencing difficulty at a stage 1 level (and as a consequence are not progressing at a rate that is pleasing) PLD recommends the presentation of the relevant short investigation to determine the basis of the difficulties.

    These screens have been designed to identify why students are not progressing or why they are experiencing difficulties acquiring skills. The screens highlight what additional skills

  • Maximising literacy development within the Junior Primary
    6-7 Year Old Comprehension Questions Progress Check

    A screen of comprehension ability focusing on predictive, interpretive and evaluative questions.

    The Comprehension Questions screens can be used to assess a child’s progress with the comprehension programs or to allow for the identification of areas of

  • Maximising literacy development within the Junior Primary
    Ages and Stages of Literacy Development – Ages 3 – 12

    A fact sheet which identifies age related milestones for literacy development in children from 3 years of age. Included are decoding and spelling skill checklists for Stage 1 (or Year 1) through to Stage 5 (or Year 5).

    Many parents wonder if their child’s reading skills are developing at the normal rate. While there are individual differences, there is a general progression of

  • Maximising literacy development within the Junior Primary
    PLD’s 2020 Whole School Literacy Plan

    The document outlines how to implement PLD’s literacy, Movement and Motor and Oral Language resources during the Early Years, Foundation, Year 1 & 2 and across Years 3 to 6. Each page provides suggested time frames and implementation recommendations.

    The purpose of this document is to provide an implementation outline to assist schools in scheduling the PLD programs within a broad school-based strategy. When

This download outlines how PLD programs link to the ACARA National Curriculum year level content descriptions.

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