Early Years Language, Literacy & Motor Developmental Milestones

Year Level: Early Years

A booklet that provides an overview of Oral Language, Literacy and Motor for children in the early years (3 and 4 year olds). Tips for home and causes for concern are also outlined. The booklet can be photocopied back to back and then folded in half to provide a compact reference.

Three and four year olds approach the world with great curiosity and a desire to explore. As a result, this age range is considered to be one of the most significant periods for the development of language, motor and cognitive skills. 3 and 4 year olds are increasingly verbal, typically learning multiple new words each day.
In addition, they are forming longer sentences and their pronunciation is becoming clearer. Motor skills are becoming more reined (showing independence with riding, jumping and catching). From 3 years old, children demonstrate an emerging awareness of words, letters and numbers.

How to Use…
This booklet has been designed to give an overview of the language, literacy and motor milestones to be expected in a child of 3 and 4 years old. Please keep in mind however, that every child’s development is unique and complex and a child may not follow these developmental milestones exactly. Although each child may develop skills at different rates, there is a predictable sequence of development. It is therefore important to consider the individual child when using these milestones.

Use these milestones and the associated tips and activity ideas to:
1. Gain a sense of your child’s strengths and areas requiring development.
2. Get tips for helping your child to develop strong language, literacy and motor skills.

REMEMBER: Always join in activities with your child.

 

See our Copyright Terms of Use at https://pld-literacy.org/help-pages/copyright-policy/.

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